[Event] Kaleidoscoping Tohoku – 3 years after the disaster in Japan 2011 –

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Kaleidoscoping-Tohoku_BANNER

Event as a director at J-COLLABO.ORG

Even after 3 years have passed since the huge disaster of tsunami, earthquake and nuclear accident in 2011, there are still many people living in temporary housing, losing their jobs in Tohoku, Northern East of Japan. However, Tohoku is not just a place of tragedy. People in Tohoku are not anonymous victims. Each place, each people deals with different challenges and takes steps toward recovery. Many outsiders from Tokyo, NY and all over the world entered Tohoku, and have been enchanted by rich culture, history of Tohoku and made relationships with local residents across generations and geographies. And now, various new projects emerging, art works, crafts, and business within which tradition and today’s contexts come together. Please come and see what’s going on in Tohoku, how people live their lives, find mutual points to work together!

[Date and Time]
3/1(Sat) & 3/2(Sun)
2pm: Open
2:30-3:30pm: Reports
– “Problem & Progress after 3 years.” (Sat)
– “How we sync Tohoku with NYC?” (Sun)
3:30pm-5pm: Reception (food and sake)
Silent Auction (2-4:30pm. Sat) | Charity Sale (2-4:30pm. Sun)

[Contents]
Report
– Yuhei Suzuki (New craft brand “TOHOK”)
– Jake Price (Documentary film “Unknown Spring” )
– Tony Sahara (NY-Fukushima Kenjinkai)
– Kenjitsu Nakagaki (Monk for silent prayer)

Exhibition
– Display of new local crafts and slide show of local life
– Documentary Film of Fukushima people

Silent Auction 3/1(Sat)
Charity Sales 3/2(Sun)
**Income of Silent Auction and Charity Sales will be utilized for stress relief of children in Tohoku.

MC: Melodee Morita

Food and sake will be served!

[Event Location and Contact]
J-LABO Brooklyn
(J-COLLABO.ORG)
300-302 7th Street Brooklyn
tel : 347-556-5893
email : ysuzuki@j-collabo.org

東日本大震災からもうすぐ3年が経過しようとしています。一方では、未だ多くの人々がふるさとを離れて仮設住宅等に在住したり、仕事や役割を失っている困難な状況が続いています。しかし他方では、東京やNY、世界各地から、また東北3県内部で、世代や出身地を越えた人の交わりが生まれており、そこから新たなアート、クラフト、ビジネスが立ち上がっています。それぞれの地域、人々、悲しみと喜び、痛みと再生のプロセス。そんな東北の多様で、そして魅力的な風景を、NYのみなさんにご紹介します。ぜひお越しください。

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[Event Report]

On 1st and 2nd March, those who are interested in current state of Tohoku, northern east of Japan 3 years after the disaster in 2011 gathered at J-LABO Brooklyn. Speakers highlighted various stories of people in Tohoku, and introduced community-based design and art initiatives. Filmmaker Jake Price screened his newest documentary film of people in Fukushima. Monk Kenjitsu Nakagaki and minister Takako Terino led a silent prayer for victims. Kayoko Ogawa from Fukushima Kenjinkai introduced the “Traveling Daycare” activity which provided children in Fukushima to play ground in low radiation areas. Designer Makoto Umebara introduced “Shimanto Newspaper Bag Tohoku Project,” which created new jobs for people in Tohoku. Community organizer Yuhei Suzuki presented a new handcraft brand “TOHOK,” to spread attractive products from Tohoku with stories. Collaborating with Love Japan, we raised $1535.46 through a silent auction, charity sale and donation, and that will be used for children in Tohoku, who have limited opportunities for play and education, to have stress relief activities.

Speakers: Jake Price, Kenjitsu Nakagaki, Takako, Terino, Kayoko Ogawa, Makoto Umebara, Yuhei Suzuki
MC: Melodee Morita
Photo Exhibition: Kei Sato

See details

Donation raised at the event was given to Traveling Daycare for Fukushima Children. Traveling Daycare for Fukushima Children is a Fukushima-based nonprofit organization, taking Fukushima children to low-radiation parks to play.

The idea of traveling daycare came from this question: “How can we provide safer environment for raising children with the least radiation?” Traveling daycare was the dream of many families in Fukushima who have children, but do not benefit from government financial support. They wanted to evacuate, but could not do so. Still, the children in Fukushima cannot play freely outside because of radiation concerns.

Traveling Daycare for Fukushima Children takes children in Fukushima to parks with low radiation. The organization goes to the chosen parks to measure the radiation level and safety before actually taking children there. It also checks the grass, the flowers, the insects, and makes plans for children to play in the park and enjoy without fears of radiation.

See details

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